Recognized HTML document

158   NATURAL INHERITANCE.   [dIIAr.

moderately artistic people do not. A man of highly artistic temperament must look on those who are deficient in it, as barbarians ; he would continually crave for a sympathy and response that such persons are incapable of giving. On the other band, every quiet unmusical man must shrink a little from the idea of wedding himself to a grand piano in constant action, with its vocal and peculiar social accompaniments ; but he might anticipate great pleasure in having a wife of a moderately artistic temperament, who would give colour and variety to his prosaic life. On the other hand, a sensitive and imaginative wife would be conscious of needing the aid of a husband who had enough plain common-sense to restrain her too enthusiastic and frequently foolish projects. If wife is read for husband, and husband for wife, the same argument still holds true.


Regression.-Having disposed of these preliminaries, we will now examine into the conditions of the inheritance of the Artistic Faculty. The data that bear upon it are summarised in Table 22, where I have not cared to separate the sexes, as my data are not numerous enough to allow of more subdivision than can be helped. Also, because from such calculations as I have made, the hereditary influences of the two sexes in respect to art appear to be pretty equal : as they are in respect to nearly every other characteristic, exclusive of diseases, that I have examined.

It is perfectly conceivable that the Artistic Faculty