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344   Life and Letters of Francis Galton


elsewhere, but at length am fairly free. It would be easy to get what you want as regards scholastic success in the U. and V. families, but in respect to health and character it might be otherwise there as elsewhere. I know that U. shrinks from anything like a medical pedigree, not because his own is other than good but on more general grounds of not alarming the young with the terror of impending, hereditary disease. Under any pseudonym, his family history would be recognised by some one, and so become generally known. I fancy that you will get the medical information you mostly want from un-related bystanders rather than from members of the family. Send me a line to remove my present difficulties that I may set to work for you. I am happily housed and gardened here. I gave a day to see my brother in the Isle of Wight, which by road, rail and steamer is about two hours off. All the rest of the time I have stuck to my books. Affectionately yours, FRANcIs GALTON.

I return the page of the B.M.J.

WINSLEY HILL, DANBY, GROSMONT R.S.O., YORKSHIRE. August 17, 1908.

MY DEAR FRANCIS GALTON, Your letter I think will have crossed one of mine. It would have been answered sooner, but it went astray, through no fault of your addressing but owing to postal blunders, which seem characteristic of this district ! I am sending you a piece of the albino memoir. Will you please let me have it back, as I have not yet corrected it, and I want to return it for Press. I have not a spare Plate of Fig. 61, but send one of Plate XXXVI. You can use the symbol '19 to mark non-adult brilliancy. It is well in the pedigree to stick to a single character, but in the account of the pedigree, put in all points bearing on this character. Thus look at Fig. 61 in proof sent. You will see hair and eye colour given as far as possible; mentally deficients and deaf mutes are cited, also any other cases of weakness or degeneracy. You will see also that age is frequently stated.

I have not yet printed a revise of the "Thesaurus" prospectus because I wanted first to see what helpers we could get. I think we shall be all right on the medical side.

I am so glad to hear your quarters are comfortable. You are certain to find nice neighbours: Are you within driving distance of Cowdray Park I It is perhaps the most beautiful park in England, if you get up to the north from the motor road through it. There is an aged oak with a seat to it on a path which strikes north after passing the dower house (I) near the west gate, which is to my mind typically English in its environment.

Here the hills are glorious purple and the "Grouseler" has not yet begun to disturb the peace. The cold, I suppose, has kept the birds back. I am glad the "Memories" are done ; how exciting it will be reading them ! Yours always affectionately, KARL PEARSON.

SHIRRELL HOUSE, SHEDFIELD, BOTLEY, HANTS. August 27, 1908.

MY DEAR KARL PEARSON, Our stay is so near its end that there is barely time for a to and fro letter, so I have written and send the enclosed at once. I have sad misgivings about being able to make out here a good U. pedigree. It is an eminently sane and healthy stock, and very athletic, but the first wife of U. (I think you will gather whom I mean) died of uterine

•   cancer. He was most unwilling this should be known to her children and contrived that the Register of Death should ascribe it to a true but secondary cause.

Professor V. comes in a few minutes to dine here. His is a noted family, I believe. I will see what can be done about it, and if favourable will write. In great haste.

Ever-affectionately, FRANCIS GALTON.

On Monday we leave here, and tour about for a week or fortnight. 42, Rutland Gate will then be my address but letters may be delayed in reaching me.


42, RUTLAND GATE, S.W. Sept. 7, 1908.

MY DEAR KARL PEARSON, Having failed to satisfy myself about the U. pedigree, I wrote to C. U., who handed my letter to his very capable son, who sends me the enclosed cards and " tree." Will they, subject to a few pencilled and other corrections, do? I replied to him that I had sent them on to you, that the names would be struck out, but that his name would be wanted for authenticity. When I hear from you, I will redraw the tree on a larger scale and see to its revision before returning it to you. Will that do 4 By when do you want it 7


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