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V.]   NORMAL VARIABILITY.   59

should have to express ourselves from another point of view, and at much greater length, and say " the Prob. Deviation of any, as yet unknown measure in the Scheme, from the Mean of all the measures from which the Scheme was constructed."

The primary idea of Q has no reference to the existence of a Mean value from which Deviations take place. It is half the difference between the measures found at the 25th and 75th Centesimal Grades. In this definition there is not the slightest allusion, direct or indirect, to the measure at the 50th Grade, which is the value of M. It is perfectly true that the measure at Grade 25° is M-Q, and that at Grade 75* is M + Q, but all this is superimposed upon the primary conception. Q stands essentially on its own basis, and has nothing to do with M. It will often happen that we shall have to deal with Prob : Deviations, but that is no reason why we should not use Q whenever it suits our purposes better, especially as statistical statements tend to be so cumbrous that every abbreviation is welcome.


The stage to which we have now arrived is this. It has been shown that the distribution of very different human qualities and faculties is approximately Normal, and it is inferred that with reasonable precautions we may treat them as if they were wholly so, in order to obtain approximate results. We shall thus deal with an entire Scheme of Deviations in terms of its Q, and with an entire Scheme of Measures in terms of its M and Q, just as we deal with an entire Circle in terms of its