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Characterisation, especially by Letters   615

GRAYSEOTT HOUSE, HASLEMERE, SURREY. November 29, 1910.

MY DEAR HILLY, There is nothing to say, the ups and downs of invalidism interest none except the persons concerned. I have been down and am up again, "le vieux (mieux) persiste." To-morrow the Copley Medal is given. The papers are too full of politics for anything about the Royal Society to be inserted beyond bare facts. It is very nice of Sir George Darwin to receive it for me. This morning's post brought the neatly typed Kantsaywhere revised and done up in book form. Methuen comes here if he can on Sunday or Monday afternoon, so I must keep it for him. This is, I expect, just the most awkward time for new publications, politics and Xmas both in front. I shall soon know more about all this. The Edward Whelers come here for two or three days about Xmas, and I shall hear much I hope then about Claverdon and Loxton. This house proves quite a success, but I have been very little out of doors, not at all of late.

Excuse if you can this extra dull letter and believe me all the same,

Ever affectionately yours, FRANCIS GALTON.


HIGHER COMBE, HASLEMERE, SURREY. December 2, 1910.

MY DEAR SIR FRANCIS, I very much enjoyed Professor Donoghue's account of Kcentsaywhere yesterday. I like the additions, particularly about the resemblance of the young women to Guido's Hours. Wouldn't a reproduction of the engraving or a photogravure of the picture make a pretty frontispiece to the book? I hope you didn't bother over my minute criticisms. I can't recall the particular sentence verbatim where I boggled over the grammatical form, the sense being plain enough. "Its absence etc...." I wonder if "Its freedom from..." or "immunity from..." would please me better. I am looking forward to my next visit, but I find on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday I have to be in London. So it must be Monday?? or Friday? Perhaps Miss Biggs would kindly let me know if Friday suits.

Yours affectionately, H. GRAHAM DARYNS.

Or that failing-Monday. You will have seen Methuen by that time.


GRAYSHOTT HOUSE, HASLEMERE, SURREY. December 6, 1910.

MY DEAR HILLY, Thanks many for all you say. The President of the Royal Society had tea here yesterday. I don't think I told you his last story, viz. that at the recent University celebrations in Liverpool, he stayed at Knowsley (Lord Derby) where Lord Morley and Lord Rosebery also were. He overheard this bit of conversation between them. Rosebery: Do you play at cards? Morley: No, it has never been my taste. Rosebery: But your Cabinet is keen upon a game, namely "Beggar your neighbour." Lord Morley tried to reply, but could not find a rejoinder. What a storm in politics. There must arrive a time for compromise. If so, I hope they will combine to diminish the Irish vote. The late Liberal candidate for this place, Methuen the publisher, had tea here two days ago. He asserts that Lloyd George has an extraordinary charm of manner in conversation, and that Lord   -, at the Conference, who is a stubborn Tory and hates him politically like Satan, was quite won over by him socially after three meetings. I doubt whether Methuen will take Kantsaywkere. I showed it to him and asked him to submit it to his reader, which he said he would do and ultimately marched off with it, but at first sight he was very dubious. He takes no interest in Eugenics. I have not ventured out of doors for a whole fortnight and crave somewhat for fresh air. Much love to you all.

Ever affectionately, FRANCIS GALTON.

Eva is in bed, recovering fast from a sudden chill (of no real consequence).


GRAYSHOTT HOUSE, IASLEMERE, SURREY. necember 11, 1910.

MY DEAR HILLY, Methuen came to tea on Monday and took Kantsaywlcere with him to submit it to his reader. He was not at all taken with the idea at first sight and may more likely than not decline it. We shall shortly see. What an inconclusive pother this election has stirred up. I wish both parties would agree to dock off the disproportionate number of Irish electors. They are a nuisance to both sides in turn. Nothing has occurred this week worth telling. I have not ventured out of doors for nearly a month. It will be a month next Tuesday. The Doctor inspects me and gossips once a week. I am grievously distressed at


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