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230   ENGLISH MEN OF SCIENCE.   [cItA

turesqueness and "grandeur in its streets which sufficed to fill the mind, and there were no petty distractions to fret a weakened eye and brain. When we are in health we take little count of the racket of English life, which may keep apathetic minds from stagnation, but which causes needless wear and tear to active ones, suggesting nothing useful, and teasing, distracting and wearying. I have heard German professors speak with wonder at our waste of energy in mere fidget, and in so-called amusements, which are mostly very dull, and ascribe the successful laboriousness of their own countrymen to the greater simplicity of the lives they lead ; and they are a happier people than we are.


Partial Failures.-We have seen that energy, health, steady pursuit of purpose, business habits, independence of views, and a strong innate taste for science, are generally combined in the character of a successful scientific man. Probably one-half of the men on my list possess every one of these qualities in a considerable, and some in a high degree. If one or more of these qualities