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222    ENGLL.SH MEN OF SCIENCE.   [cEAr.

stances after manhood, and in direct opposition to family influences. (11) To opportunity at [a foreign university.

Geology.-(8) The tastes developed gradually after manhood.

SUMMARY.

If we take a general survey of our national stock of capabilities and their produce, we see that the larger part is directed to gain daily

bread and necessary luxuries, and to keep the great social machine in steady work. The surplus is considerable, and may be disposed of in various ways. Let us now put ourselves in the position of advocates of science solely, and consider from that point of view how the surplus capabilities of the -nation might be diverted to its furtherance. How can the tastes of men be most powerfully acted upon, to affect them towards science ?

The large category (A) of innate tastes is practically beyond our immediate influence ; but