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III.]   ORIGIN OF TASTE FOR SCIENCE.   181

(3) " Not at all especially innate. I could have taken to any other subject quite as well, so far as I know. I trace the origin of my interest in science to the knowledge that I must do my best in it to earn a livelihood and to please my parents. I did not follow my own branch from any special liking -indeed, I disliked it ; but it was necessary to follow some branch. The connection with an hospital and medical school in . . . . have been inducements to continue work, and all my life I have worked pretty steadily." (d)


(4) " I cannot perceive that they were innate. Possibly my tastes were due to retentiveness of memory as to objects and facts, and a strong impression that good surgery is a great fact. Subsequently, by the approval of teachers, when between get. 18 and 20, having been selected chief assistant to the most popular teacher of anatomy of his day, and also to a professor of surgery." (c, g)


(5) " Had an interest excited in philosophical