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111.1   ORIGIN OF TASTE FOR SCIENCE.   173

fessor . .. . of    at whose side I visited

the poor in the lanes of    day and night. First began to work and concentrate energies to one branch eet. 21, when appointed . . . ."

(a, d, e, g)

(18) "They have been, I believe, nearly in an equal degree the mixed result of a natural bias and education,. and were determined by professional study, when a love of scientific knowledge for its own sake first took possession of my mind." (a, d)

(19) "How far innate, and how far acquired and developed from my early youth, I cannot say. My love for animals of all kinds was very strong, and to gratify it I overcame every ob. stacle put in my way at home, when I was a boy. I trace the origin of my interest in science to the earliest impressions of my childhood, all of which, so far as I recollect them, are connected with my father, and the various animals he brought me as pets. They were not largely determined by events after manhood. I should have been an observer of animal life