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270   MEMORIES OF MY LIFE

those measured at the above Exhibition about 1 70 per cent. were weaker and 30 per cent, stronger.

This little table contains excellent material for comparing the powers of the two sexes.

From Measurements made at the Anthropometric Laboratory in
the International Health Exhibition of 1884.

 
     

Centiles.

Subject of

Measurement.

Unit of

Measure.

Sex.

         

10°

30°

50°

70°

90°

   

M.

645

66.5

67'9

69'2

71'3

Height standing,

without shoes

Inches {

F•

59.9

62.1

63.3

64.6

66.4

Span of arms

Inches

M.

66.1

68.2

69'9

71'4

73'6

   

F•

59.5

61.7

63'o

64.5

66.7

Weight in indoor

pounds (

M.

125

135

143

150

165

clothing   }

t

F.

105

114

122

132

142

Breathing capacity

Cubic

{

M.

F.-

177

199

219

236

277

 

inches

 

102

124

138

151

177

Strength o f pull

pounds

M.

6o

68

74

78

89

with a bow   }

{

F.

32

36

40

44

51

One of my many inquiries related to what I called

Number Forms"; it originated in this way. Mr. George Bidder, Q.C., son of the engineer who in his youth was the famous "calculating boy" (i 8o61878), and who iQherited and transmitted much of his father's remarkable powers, wrote in a postscript of a letter to me in response to other inquiries, that he himself habitually saw numbers in his mind's eye,

1 The word "about" is a slight reservation due to each class man, being one-half place short of his nominal class-place. In a class of loo, the topmost occupies the post of J, and the lowest that of 99k. There

are 1o1 divisions or "rungs" from o° to 100° inclusive, but only 100 persons. The existence of this half place may be neglected by the ordinary reader, though an expert would lay stress upon it.