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ANTHROPOMETRIC LABORATORIES 245

faculties tested, by the best methods known to modern science?" I went on to describe what could be done in this way by existing methods, and what more it was desirable to have.

When the International Exhibition of 1884 was under consideration, I offered to equip and maintain a Laboratory there, if a suitable place were given, the woodwork set up, and the security of it taken off my hands. This was done, and I arranged a long narrow enclosure with trellis-work, in front and at its ends. A table ran alongside the trellis-work on which the instruments were placed and where the applicants were tested, and a passage was left between the table and the wall. This gave a quasi-privacy, while it enabled outsiders to see a little of what was going on inside. A doorkeeper stationed at one end admitted a single applicant at a time, who had to pay threepence. The superintendent took him through the tests in ,turn, and dismissed him at the other end with his schedule filled up. Sometimes I helped him ; then two persons could be tested together, the one a little in advance of the other. The arrangement worked smoothly, and the Laboratory was seldom unemployed.

The measurements dealt with Keenness of Sight and of Hearing; Colour Sense, Judgment of Eye ; Breathing Power ; Reaction Time ; Strength of Pull and of Squeeze ; Force of Blow ; Span of Arms; Height, both standing and sitting ; and Weight. The ease of working the instruments that were used was so great that an applicant could be measured in all these respects, a card containing the results furnished him, and a duplicate made and kept for statistical purposes, at the total cost of the threepenny