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CAMBRIDGE   81

collected at random, some few will probably be found who are destined to rise to distinction, but among a group of those who are ranked as the foremost in a University, more than one half of them will do so.

For my own part, I had hoped to take respectable mathematical honours, though perhaps it was never in my power to do so, notwithstanding the assurances of my eminent tutor, Mr. I-Iopkins. But the utter breakdown of my health in my third year, as already explained, made further study of a severe kind impossible. I therefore followed my bent in reading what I could, and my time was by no means wasted. I contented myself with a Poll Degree. judge therefore of my surprise a few years ago, while passing a winter on the Riviera, when a telegram reached me saying I had been elected to the rare honour of an Honorary Fellowship in Trinity College. I thought at first it must be a mistake, but it was not. Nay more, hearing that a copy of a portrait recently made of me by the late Charles purse (,(ee frontispiece)

1 1 he tt;ceptt~l~le, I ) Rl one made anld, offered it to the authorities of the College. I t now hangs in its Hall among those of men with whom I feel it the highest possible honour to be associated in any way.

I must recur briefly to the close of my medical education. As already mentioned, I attended some lectures during one term at Cambridge, but had not even admittance to the then small Addenbrook I-Iospital. I have little to tell about this period that would interest others than myself. It was thought well that I should complete my course in London at St. George's, for the purpose of seeing new conditions of medical treatment.   I attended these

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